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Rev. Marti Keller

Rev. Marti Keller is the affiliated minister with the Unitarian Universalist Women's Federation and an independent consultant on congregational ministry. She has been both a parish and community minister, serving congregations in the Mid-South since 1998. She has been a guest speaker in many pulpits, including Dublin, Ireland, and San Miguel De Allende, Mexico.

Rev. Keller is endorsed by the Humanist Society as a Humanist Celebrant. Endorsed Humanist Celebrants are the clergy of the Humanist Society (American Humanist Association) and are authorized to both act as legal officiants at weddings and to conduct memorials and perform other ceremonial functions.

She is also a published poet with Thinking in Haiku (CreateSpace, 2017, available from Amazon.com) and chapbooks: Prickly Pear (Farm House Press, 2009) and South/West (Shakespeare's Sisters Press, 2013). She is the co-editor, with Leah Hart-Landsberg, of Jewish Voices in Unitarian Universalism (Skinner House, 2014). She is also an author and editor of Faith of UU Jews, part of the welcoming pamphlet library of the Unitarian Universalist Association.

Rev. Marti Keller is available to perform weddings. For those who are interested in the kind of services that reflect their own spirituality and religious beliefs, who want to avoid patriarchal and sexist words and symbols, who want to celebrate rather than solemnize their commitment, Unitarian Universalist services are ideal. [More About Marti]

Contact Marti

Rev. Keller’s New Poetry Book Now Available

Thinking in Haiku (CreateSpace, 2017) uses the structure and form of haiku to capture both the natural world and contemporary everyday events: scooping coffee, visiting the eye doctor, hanging curtains in a gentrifying apartment. Rev. Keller has come to "think in haiku," viewing and commenting on the world around her in a stripped down syntax, translated into this poetic genre — in what has become a powerful spiritual practice.

Available now from Amazon.com

Work (Always) as Salvation - Yes, I have worked and am still working, under the presumption that it has significant meaning and purpose. But salvation through work? Beyond the money earned literally saving us from hunger and homelessness, what did it mean to our own religious forebears? And how does it continue to inform and shape us now?

Latest Poem

For Emily: Who Also Loved Horticulture

You loved what was left for you,

Lilacs and raspberries,

You raised hothouse flowers, fruits

Out of climate,

Managed the land between the front door

And cedar border.

The back garden was yours, the greenhouse

And the air

On certain Sabbaths when you stayed behind

With the wrens and the roses.

Upcoming Speaking Events

Sep 03 2017
  • Sep
    3
    2017
    Northwest UU Congregation

    1025 Mt.Vernon Highway NW, Sandy Springs, GA 30327

    Time: 10:00 am


Sep 17 2017
  • Sep
    17
    2017
    Georgia Mountains UU Church

    439 South Park Street, Dahlonega, GA 30533

    Time: 11:00 am


Oct 01 2017
Dec 10 2017